Theology of the Body Workshop on April 13

Theology of the Body Workshop
“How to Teach Our Children the Beauty of Sexuality”


Date: Saturday, April 13, 2019

Schedule:
Session 1 -- 9:00 AM - 11:30 AM
- Introduction to the Theology of the Body

Break for Lunch -- 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM

Session 2 -- 12:30 PM - 3 PM
- Practical application of the Theology of the Body, specifically in teaching children about the beauty of sexuality.

(If you attended the workshop in November, you need only attend Session 2, but you are welcome to both sessions.)

Event Address: SS Peter and Paul School Building, 1150 2nd Street North, Wisconsin Rapids, WI 54494
Contact: Maggie Kosloski (maggiekosloski@gmail.com)

Registration Fee: $10 paid at the door (If you attended the workshop in November, there is no additional charge.)

Jen Messing from Into the Deep Ministries will be leading the conference.

Click Here to Register


Pastor's Letter - March 24, 2019

The last two weeks I shared some reflections on the sacrament of Baptism, and today I would like to continue with that. Parents begin thinking about a name for their baby long before the child is born. Frequently they will consider names that have a family or ethnic history. (I’m named after my father, and one brother is named after my grandfather.) Since a name provides an “identity” for a person, the selection of a name is very important. There is a long tradition among Christians to name children after the Saints or significant biblical persons. By doing so we provide for the newly baptized child a patron and model for living the Christian life. The selection of a name for a child reflects one’s values as well. This is why Christians ought to look to the Saints – and not the current television, movie, or music stars – when considering names for their children. Expectant parents can find books with Saints’ names at any good Catholic bookstore (or they can google ‘saints’ names’ on the internet). In addition to the selection of a name, parents should carefully consider who will be the sponsors at their child’s baptism. Godparents are the spiritual counterparts to parents. Therefore, a child to be baptized should have one Godmother and one Godfather. Godparents have a mission to assist the parents in seeing that the baptized child is nurtured in the Faith, and leads a life that is in harmony with one’s baptism. Godparents must be baptized and confirmed in the Catholic Faith. Of course, since they are serving as sponsors for one being baptized in the Catholic Faith, they must practice the Catholic Faith. Most parishes will request some evidence that a proposed sponsor is a Catholic in good standing (a letter from his or her pastor, for example), if the sponsor is not a member of the parish of baptism. It is permissible for a non-Catholic Christian to serve as a witness to baptism, as long as the other sponsor is Catholic. More on the Sacrament of Baptism next week.

May God bless you! Fr. Schaller

Don't forget our Movie of the Month: Joseph of Nazareth!

Join us on FORMED and view great content each month!

As a parish, you are encouraged to take advantage of the following movies, studies and eBooks during the Month of March 2019:


Movie: Joseph of Nazareth
Study: A Lent to Remember
eBook: Meditations for Lent









NEW TO FORMED?

Access FORMED, 24/7 on your smartphone, computer, iPad, or Kindle, you can:
  • Prepare for Mass each week by watching an insightful five-minute video on the Sunday Readings; 
  • Enjoy movies as a family that are both nourishing and entertaining; 
  • Enrich your marriage with the award-winning video program Beloved; and 
  • Help your children grow in faith and character with engaging children’s materials.

Go to: http://ssppwisrapids.formed.org/ and enter in code below to sign-up:

FNE Pancake Breakfast - April 7

FNE Pancake Breakfast

8am-12:30pm, Sun, Apr. 7 @ SS Peter & Paul (here!)

Adults $8 / Ages 6-12 $5 / 5&under Free Family Rate $25 (parents w/ children high school & under) Menu includes buttermilk & potato pancakes, sausage, real maple syrup, applesauce, cheese, & cookies.

Pastor's Letter - March 17, 2019

Last week I began some reflections on the sacrament of Baptism, and today I would like to continue with that. Like every sacrament, Baptism is a sacred ritual celebrated with certain material elements, actions, and words. I mentioned last week that water is used because of its natural symbolism: it is used to cleanse us and is necessary for life. It is fitting that the Lord should direct His Church to use water in this sacrament to cleanse one from sin, and bring about a “new life” in Christ. In the first centuries of Christianity it was the usual custom to immerse one in water, but other forms (sprinkling or pouring water) were occasionally used. It is understandable that immersion fell out of favor in the colder climates, especially in regards to children. Heated churches now allow for immersion to be used in some Catholic churches, though other practical considerations still make pouring the preferred form in most places. In all cases, the ritual is always accompanied by the words “I baptize you in the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.” This is mandated by the Lord Himself before He ascended to His Father in heaven (Matthew 28:19). Although the ordinary minister of the sacrament is the priest or deacon, in an emergency any person may baptize. They need simply to pour water over the person while saying the words the Lord gave us in Matthew. Of course, like all the sacraments, the preference is always that this sacred ritual be celebrated in the church by the Church’s minister (priest or deacon). Because the Lord teaches the necessity of Baptism (John 3:5), it is important that parents arrange (preferably before its birth) for the Baptism of their child soon after its birth. Next week I will talk about the role of Godparents, and the naming of the child.

Today (Sunday), and each of the Sundays of Lent, we have a Holy Hour of Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament from 4-5pm, during which we also pray Solemn Vespers (evening prayer) beginning about 4:30pm. Religious brothers and sisters, priests and deacons, are obliged to pray the “Liturgy of the Hours” daily, though all the faithful are invited to do so. All are invited to join Deacon Ruesch and me in this beautiful and ancient prayer of the Church.

May God bless you! Fr. Schaller

Check out our picks for the Movie, Study and eBook of the Month!

Join us on FORMED and view great content each month!

As a parish, you are encouraged to take advantage of the following movies, studies and eBooks during the Month of March 2019:


Movie: Joseph of Nazareth
Study: A Lent to Remember
eBook: Meditations for Lent









NEW TO FORMED?

Access FORMED, 24/7 on your smartphone, computer, iPad, or Kindle, you can:
  • Prepare for Mass each week by watching an insightful five-minute video on the Sunday Readings; 
  • Enjoy movies as a family that are both nourishing and entertaining; 
  • Enrich your marriage with the award-winning video program Beloved; and 
  • Help your children grow in faith and character with engaging children’s materials.

Go to: http://ssppwisrapids.formed.org/ and enter in code below to sign-up:

FORMED Movie, Study and eBook of the Month!

Join us on FORMED and view great content each month!

As a parish, you are encouraged to take advantage of the following movies, studies and eBooks during the Month of March 2019:


Movie: Joseph of Nazareth
Study: A Lent to Remember
eBook: Meditations for Lent









NEW TO FORMED?

Access FORMED, 24/7 on your smartphone, computer, iPad, or Kindle, you can:
  • Prepare for Mass each week by watching an insightful five-minute video on the Sunday Readings; 
  • Enjoy movies as a family that are both nourishing and entertaining; 
  • Enrich your marriage with the award-winning video program Beloved; and 
  • Help your children grow in faith and character with engaging children’s materials.

Go to: http://ssppwisrapids.formed.org/ and enter in code below to sign-up: