Pastor's Letter - November 11, 2018

It should be evident that a pastor’s primary responsibility is the spiritual welfare of his people. He is not a business manager, nor is he a building contractor, though it sure doesn’t hurt to have some of those skills, too! In his care for his people, a pastor must model himself after the Lord Himself, Who taught, healed, reprimanded, comforted, and encouraged the people. Yet, in all His teachings, it may come as a surprise to many, that – of all the things that Jesus spoke about – He talked about money the most. Think about it – the parables of the Prodigal Son, the Talents, the Unforgiving Steward, and many more – all deal with money. And then there is the account in today’s Gospel of the Widow’s Mite. The Church, following the example of the Lord, needs to teach strongly the dangers of the undue attachment to money and material things. It is not that these things are evil in themselves, though they can become a temptation for us to be selfish. Rather, God gives us these things so that we might demonstrate our generosity towards one another. That is why our financial stewardship towards the Church is so important. It fulfills two important Christian ideals: it demonstrates tangibly that one is not attached to material things, and it assists the Church in order to fulfill Her mission. And one doesn’t have to be rich (remember the widow in today’s Gospel). Everyone has the opportunity to be generous.

St. Paul reminds us of the importance of praying for our civil rulers; so it is most appropriate that we pray for all our newly (re-)elected public officials. May God grant them wisdom so that they might provide for the protection of the weakest and promote the common good.

My thanks to Msgr. Robert Hundt who is filling in this weekend while I am in Italy on Pilgrimage. Thanks also to Frs. Bill Menzel and Aaron Becker who are celebrating the weekday Masses during my absence. Be assured of my prayers for you while I visit the many holy sites in Rome and throughout Italy.

May God bless you! Fr. Schaller

Toys for Joy


Toys for Joy
A sincere thank-you to Arlene Hamm, Mandy Haferman, & all the others who contributed to Toys for Joy during September & October. Because of their generosity, 24 stuffed animals were taken to Aspirus ER & Urgent Care. So far, 241 toys have been donated in 2018. If you wish to contribute, a box in the back of church is ready to receive your donations. Toys must be new with tags attached.


HELP NEEDED for SWEPS
A sincere thank-you to the 12 volunteers from our congregation who worked at the Pantry Shelf during the last week of September! In that month, 45 new families were served with 504 households and 1,308 individuals. They were provided with enough food and hygiene products for 1 week.

Our next scheduled weeks to work are: January 7-11, April 22-26, August 5-9, November 18-22

At least 16 volunteers are needed for each week.

Donations should be taken to 331 12th Ave S. Children’s books, food, brown paper bags, & egg cartons are appreciated. For more info, call Beverly Stimac, our parish representative.


See more in the Bulletin

What's on FORMED? Ode to Saint Cecilia Audio Drama


Ode to Saint Cecilia tells the dramatic story of a modest young woman from Rome whose life was transcended time to influence poets, composers, sculptors, and painters. A patron saint to some, a muse to others, Cecilia has inspired George F. Handel, John Dryden, Henry Purcell, Stefan Maderno, John Waterhouse, Paul Simon, and scores of other artists over the past 20 centuries.

Augustine Institute Radio Theatre's Ode to Saint Cecilia includes cinematic sound, original music, and the award-winning talents of highly-acclaimed British actors, including: Hayley Atwell, Sir Derek Jacobi, Brian Blessed, Dame Siân Phillips.
Access FORMED, 24/7 on your smartphone, computer, iPad, or Kindle, you can:
  • Prepare for Mass each week by watching an insightful five-minute video on the Sunday Readings; 
  • Enjoy movies as a family that are both nourishing and entertaining; 
  • Enrich your marriage with the award-winning video program Beloved; and 
  • Help your children grow in faith and character with engaging children’s materials.

Go to: http://ssppwisrapids.formed.org/ and enter in code:

Pastor's Letter - November 4, 2018

The Church’s Liturgical year concludes in several weeks with the Solemnity of Christ the King. The Sunday readings for these last several weeks draw our attention to the End Times: our personal end (when one dies), and the end of time when the Lord returns in glory. This is an additional reason why November is set aside as a special time to pray for the dead. It is also a good time for us to review the rituals of the Church at the time of death.

Since in baptism the body was marked with the seal of the Trinity and became the temple of the Holy Spirit, Christians respect and honor the bodies of the dead and the places where they rest. In addition, it is this body which we honor in death that the Lord will raise on the Last Day. Care must be made that we do not simply conform to secular standards in regards to care for the bodies of the dead and in the funeral rites. In particular we should be cautious so that secular or profane practices do not make their way into the Funeral Mass. Sacred (and Catholic) music only should be played or sung at the funeral. The presence of legitimate secular symbols (for example, symbols of one’s past military service) may be used during public visitation (in the church or at the funeral home), if they are displayed with some restraint. The Church, seeking always to stress our belief in the resurrection of the body, strongly recommends that funeral rites be conducted with the body present. Cremation is allowed, as long as one does not choose it for anti-Christian motives. In such a case, cremation should be done after the funeral rites (after the Funeral Mass). Out of respect for the body, the ancient Christian custom is to bury or entomb the bodies of the dead. This includes the cremated remains. One should never have the cremated remains in an urn in one’s home, and the practice of scattering ashes is strictly forbidden. In all cases, the Church warmly encourages the faithful to offer prayers for the dead. One of the most beautiful ways of praying for our beloved dead is to have a Mass offered for their intention (the suggested offering for a Mass is $10.00 – please contact the parish office). We unite ourselves more closely to our beloved dead, and assist them in the process of purification so that they might more easily enter the glories of Heaven. Eternal rest grant unto them, O Lord. And let perpetual light shine upon them!

I leave today for a 11-day Pilgrimage to Italy. Be assured of my prayers for you while I visit the many holy sites in Rome and throughout Italy. Msgr. Robert Hundt will be here for next weekend’s Masses, and Frs. Menzel and Becker will have the weekday Masses.

A big “THANK YOU” to all our parishioners who have contributed generously with their gifts and prayers for the Diocesan Annual Appeal! Haven’t made your pledge, yet? Join me and your fellow parishioners in supporting SSPP, our Diocese, and the wider Church, by your gift to the DAA!

May God bless you! Fr. Schaller

Men's Holy League

Men’s Holy League 
The Men’s Holy League will next be meeting on Fri, Nov. 9, at 6:00pm. If there are enough people, there will be refreshments afterwards.


HELP NEEDED for SWEPS
A sincere thank-you to the 12 volunteers from our congregation who worked at the Pantry Shelf during the last week of September! In that month, 45 new families were served with 504 households and 1,308 individuals. They were provided with enough food and hygiene products for 1 week.

Our next scheduled weeks to work are: January 7-11, April 22-26, August 5-9, November 18-22

At least 16 volunteers are needed for each week.

Donations should be taken to 331 12th Ave S. Children’s books, food, brown paper bags, & egg cartons are appreciated. For more info, call Beverly Stimac, our parish representative.

St Patrick’s Unit 6 Meeting
9:30am, Thu, Nov. 8 in the SSPP church basement
We will be addressing the Christmas cards to be given out to the local nursing homes. Any interested lady is welcome to join us in helping to benefit SS Peter & Paul. Ethel Knapinski is our hostess.


Mitten Tree
Oct. 27—Dec. 16
The PCCW Mitten Tree project is about to begin! A box is located in the back of church for your donations of hats, mittens, scarves, & socks. They will be distributed to our local schools & the Family Center.


See more in the Bulletin

What's on FORMED? 15 Things to Do in the Midst of Suffering



Suffering is a mystery we all face at some time in our lives. Whether it is physical, emotional, or spiritual, it may test our faith. Internationally known speaker Jeff Cavins shares personal insights he gained through his own physical pain. He shows us how we can join our sufferings with those of Jesus on the Cross, bringing renewed meaning to the suffering we experience in our lives.
Access FORMED, 24/7 on your smartphone, computer, iPad, or Kindle, you can:
  • Prepare for Mass each week by watching an insightful five-minute video on the Sunday Readings; 
  • Enjoy movies as a family that are both nourishing and entertaining; 
  • Enrich your marriage with the award-winning video program Beloved; and 
  • Help your children grow in faith and character with engaging children’s materials.

Go to: http://ssppwisrapids.formed.org/ and enter in code:

How to Teach Our Children About the Beauty of Sexuality - Registration Form

How to Teach Our Children About the Beauty of Sexuality - Sunday, Nov. 4th, starting at 1:30 PM at Sts. Peter and Paul Church, there will be a workshop for parents and those who work with children entitled "How to Teach Our Children About the Beauty of Sexuality." Jen Messing from Into the Deep Ministries will be leading the workshop.


Click here to download the registration form